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Awards

The Times Star staff has collected countless awards from the Oklahoma Press Association over the last decade for their achievements in journalism. Recognitions include two-time winner of Outstanding Photo of the Month and the coveted Sequoyah Award. The Sequoyah Award is the highest honor the Oklahoma Press Association can bestow.

History of Collinsville

Drawn by the fertile bluegrass prairie and the huge coal beds beneath, settlers from all over began to gather to form a community. The year was 1897, and this was the beginning of what is now Collinsville. The new, settlement (located about one mile east of the present town site on the R. E. Graham allotment) was without a name for a short time. However, the citizens persuaded Dr. A. H. Collins, a surveyor and engineer, to move his post office (located on his allotment about two miles north of Owasso), to the new town site. To get Collins to move it, it was promised that the new town would be named after him. On May 26, 1897, the Collins post office was established, then on June 16, 1898, the name was changed to Collinsville.

"In accordance with the court proceedings held at Muscogee, Indian Territory Northern District, on April 1, 1899, in which the Petition for Incorporation of the Town of Collinsville, Indian Territory, was granted, the same bearing the Honorable Judge William Springer's signature." (Taken from the Collinsville News, Volume 1, No. 1, May 11, 1899.)

For almost two years, the community of Collinsville (Old Town) flourished. Charley "Jack" Taylor was the first mayor. E.B. Dunaway and A. J. Clawson established the first store in town. Clawson was also postmaster.

In the summer of 1899, the Sante Fe Railroad  was built through the present site of Collinsville. Shortly after the railroad was built most of the residents of Old Town moved to the present location. Present day Collinsville is located from 97th East Avenue on the west to 145th East Avenue on the east, and 126th Street North on the South to 166th Street North on the north. U.S. Highway 75 is located four miles west of downtown and surrounding residential areas.

The Collinsville town site was laid out on the Thad Morris allotment (south of 146th Street North) and the John French allotment (north of 146th Street North). "Uncle Rod" Perry and John Detwiler built the first business building in the new town. This was a general merchandise store and restaurant and was erected at the northwest corner of 9th and Main.

In the early 1900's, natural gas was discovered near Collinsville. At full capacity the plant employed 40 to 50 men and was one of the largest brick plants in the state. Bricks from this plant were shipped all over the United States. In 1913, these bricks were used to pave the main streets of Collinsville (some 50 blocks), as well as many of the brick buildings erected, plus several brick homes in Collinsville.

An early boom for Collinsville came with the smelter industry in 1911. The Chamber of Commerce induced the Prime Western and Bartlesville Zink smelters to locate there. Large numbers of people moved to Collinsville at the time to live and work. The town was one of the firsts in Indian Territory to have a municipally owned light and power plant. Many buildings were built in the early boom days (population 8,000) including a three-story high school in 1909, city hall in 1913, and the Carnegie Library in 1917.

Many of the residences built in the early 1900's remain in Collinsville today. Collinsville's earliest residences were built in an area bounded by Walnut, Spring, 5th, and 16th Streets. Eleven (11) new subdivisions totaling 796 lots were added to the town during the early stages of development.

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Bill Johnston

Owner and Publisher

54 year veteran of the media business.

Is a multi-award winner from the Oklahoma Press Association including the 2013 Sequoyah Award while serving as Editor of the Collinsville News

office: (918) 710-5740
direct: (918) 510-4062

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Court Newkirk

Advertising Manager

20-plus years in the media business as sales manager, general manager and play-by-play announcer

20-plus years in economic development for several different Oklahoma communities

office: (918) 710-5740
direct: (918) 710-5743

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Ted Wright

Staff Photographer and Contributing Writer

Ted is owner and operator of Collinsville’s Communication Web Site www.cvilleok.com

He also works for the Collinsville Public Schools maintaining their web site

An accomplished photographer, Ted provides the history page information in the Times Star

email: wrightted@aol.com
office phone: (918) 710-5740
direct: (918) 798-1804.

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Norman Van Sickle

Staff Photographer

Mr. Van Sickle has been taken photographs for many years and has a sterling reputation among hundreds for his quality work.

website: www.vancophotography
email: nvansickle@aol.com
office: (918) 710-5740
direct: (918) 845-6676.

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Heather Lyon

Office Manager

In charge of subscriptions and classified advertising.

Heather has been in the newspaper business about a year and is in charge of keeping the rest of the staff in line!

Loved by all who meet her, Heather will do her best to meet the needs of the public doing business with the Times Star.

office: (918) 710-5740
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday

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Ron Evans

Distribution

The long-time educator and retired teacher is a native of Collinsville and takes care of the retail outlets for the Times Star making the community’s newspaper available in retail outlets all around the city.

office: (918) 710-5740